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Contents

Adding New Content

Adding new content to the wiki is simple! Start by searching for a keyword you would like to enter information about. This will let you know if the word already exists in the wiki. If it does not, you will be presented with the option to add a new entry for this word.

Formatting text: http://www.aboutus.org/AboutUs:Basic_wiki_formatting

Wiki tag syntax cheatsheet

Creating Links

Creating Links is easy to do.

Wiki Links

To create inter-wiki links, that is, a page that links to another wiki article, simply place 2 (two) brackets around the word you wish to make a link.

ex: [[DHCP]] will automatically create a link to the DHCP page in the wiki.

To create links to a wiki page where the text you entered does not match the link you are making, create the link, but insert the pipe character | and a description after.

ex: To create a link to Server List but with the text "a list of servers" enter:

[[Server List|a list of servers]] and the result should be a list of servers.

External Links

You can make an external link just by typing a URL:
http://www.mica.edu
You can give it a title:
[http://www.mica.edu MICA]
Or leave the title blank:
[http://www.nupedia.com]

Attaching Images

After an image is uploaded to the wiki, you can attach it in any entry page by simply inserting the code:

[[Image:imagename.ext|options]]

These options include:

  • Type - 'thumb' / 'thumbnail' or 'frame'. Causes image to be displayed with specific formatting
  • Location - 'right', 'left', 'center' or 'none'. Determines placement of the image on the page. Defaults to 'left'.
  • Size - {width}px or {width}x{height}px, scales the image to be no greater than the given width and height, keeping its aspect ratio.
  • Caption - Any element which cannot be identified as one of the above is assumed to be caption text.

Including Content

You can include an article inside of another page by inserting {{:Page Name}}

Setting Category

Add this tag [[Category:category name]] to the end of articles to make them appear in the category listings. You can add more then one category tag if need be. Just paste the whole tag multiple times.

Including References

Usage

The basic concept of the <ref> tag is that it inserts the text enclosed by the ref tags as a footnote in a designated section, which you indicate with the placeholder tag .

If you forget to include <references/> at the end of the article, none of the footnotes will appear. This page itself uses footnotes, such as the one at the end of this sentence. If you view the source of this page by clicking "Edit this page", you can see a working example of footnotes.

Example:

According to scientists, the Sun is pretty big.<ref>E. Miller, The Sun, (New York: Academic Press, 2005), 23-5.</ref>
The Moon, however, is not so big.<ref>R. Smith, "Size of the Moon", Scientific American, 46 (April 1978): 44-6.</ref>

Result:

According to scientists, the Sun is pretty big.[1]
The Moon, however, is not so big.[2]

Multiple uses of the same footnote

To give a footnote a unique identifier, use <ref name="name">. You can then refer to the same footnote again by using a ref tag with the same name. The text inside the second tag doesn't matter, because the text already exists in the first reference. You can either copy the whole footnote, or you can use a terminated empty ref tag that looks like this: <ref name="name" />. In the following example, the same source is cited three times. This is an example of multiple references to the same footnote.<ref name="multiple">Remember that when you refer to the same footnote multiple times, the text from the first reference is used.</ref>

Such references are particularly useful when citing sources, if different statements come from the same source.<ref name="multiple">This text is superfluous, and won't show up anywhere. We may as well just use an empty tag.</ref>

A concise way to make multiple references is to use empty ref tags, which have a slash at the end. Although this may reduce redundant work, please be aware that if a future editor removes the first reference, this will result in the loss of all references using the empty ref tags.<ref name="multiple" />

Such references are particularly useful when citing sources, when different statements come from the same source.

A concise way to make multiple references is to use empty ref tags, which have a slash at the end. Although this may reduce redundant work, please be aware that if a future editor removes the first reference, this will result in the loss of all references using the empty ref tags.

<references />

Placing <references /> inserts the full text of all pending inline citations defined by <ref>, anywhere on the page. For example, based on the citations above, the code: <references />

will yield:

  1. E. Miller, The Sun, (New York: Academic Press, 2005), 23-5.
  2. R. Smith, "Size of the Moon", Scientific American, 46 (April 1978): 44-6.
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